Jul 15, 2024  
2022-2023 Cal State East Bay Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Cal State East Bay Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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MLL 352 - Japanese Folktales and Culture


Units: 4 ; Breadth Area: GE-UD-C
A survey of Japanese folklore that studies the folk cultures and narratives (folklores, legends, myths, and jokes) with focus on the relationship between animal roles and the livelihood of Japanese people. Taught in English with an optional Japanese module. 

Strongly Recommended Preparation: Upper division status (greater than 60 earned semester units) and completion of lower division Area C requirements.
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Areas A1, A2, A3, and B4 with grade C- (CR) or better. 
Repeatability: May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 units.
Possible Instructional Methods: Entirely On-ground, or Entirely Online, or Hybrid.
Grading: A-F or CR/NC (student choice).
Breadth Area(s) Satisfied: GE-UD-C - Upper Division Arts or Humanities
Course Typically Offered: Variable Intermittently


Student Learning Outcomes - Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:
  1. Demonstrate knowledge of Japanese folktales and capture the view of Japan and United States.
  2. Describe and interpret items of folklore from oral tradition and in written and visual format.
  3. Compare and contrast both Japanese and English folktales.
  4. Evaluate how Japan present itself to the world via folktales, and how the rest of the world such as the US frames, receives, and questions this presentation.
  5. Analyze a story composed of complex sentence structures and Japanese characters.
  6. Demonstrate proficiency of Japanese language in reading Japanese folktales and writing comments in Japanese and English.
  7. Demonstrate how the perspectives of the arts and humanities are used by informed, engaged, and reflective citizens to benefit local and global communities


UD-C. Upper-division Arts or Humanities Learning Outcomes
  1. demonstrate an understanding of and ability to apply the principles, methodologies, value systems, and thought processes employed in the arts and humanities;
  2. analyze cultural production as an expression of, or reflection upon, what it means to be human; and
  3. demonstrate how the perspectives of the arts and humanities are used by informed, engaged, and reflective citizens to benefit local and global communities.



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