Jul 12, 2024  
2022-2023 Cal State East Bay Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Cal State East Bay Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]


Social Justice Overlay

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BIOL 335 - Humans: Health and Disease


Units: 3 ; Breadth Area: GE-UDB; Social Justice
Introduction to basic principles of human biology, including anatomy and physiology, pertaining to human health and disease. Specific topics are considered through a Social Justice lens, focusing on how socioeconomic and racial inequality contribute to disparities in health outcomes.

 

Strongly Recommended Preparation: Upper division status (greater than 60 earned semester units) and completion of lower division Areas B1-B3.
Prerequisites: Completion of GE Areas A1, A2, A3 and B4 with grade C- (CR) or better.
Credit Restrictions: Not for Biology major credit.

Possible Instructional Methods: Entirely On-ground, or Entirely Online.
Grading: A-F or CR/NC (student choice).
Breadth Area(s) Satisfied: GE-UDB- Upper Division Science Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning, Overlay - Social Justice
Course Typically Offered: Fall & Spring


Student Learning Outcomes - Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:

  1. Draw on a basic knowledge of human biology to describe the impact of diseases on physiological systems;
  2. Describe how unequal access to resources (e.g., clean air, water, nutritious food, health care) contribute to the onset of disease and adverse health outcomes;
  3. Apply knowledge of human biology to evaluate claims made in the media regarding, for example, genetically modified organisms, vaccines, fad diets, and dietary supplements;
  4. Identify pathways for effecting change in health outcomes at individual and community levels.


UD-B. Upper-division Science Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning Learning Outcomes
 

  1. demonstrate advanced and/or focused science or quantitative content knowledge in a specific scientific field, using appropriate vocabulary and referencing appropriate concepts (such as models, uncertainties, hypotheses, theories, and technologies);
  2. apply advanced quantitative skills (such as statistics, algebraic solutions, interpretation of graphical data) to scientific problems and evaluate scientific claims;
  3. demonstrate understanding of the nature of science and scientific inquiry and the experimental and empirical methodologies used in science to investigate a scientific question or issue; and
  4. apply science content knowledge to contemporary scientific issues (e.g., global warming) and technologies (e.g., cloning), where appropriate.
Social Justice Overlay Learning Outcomes
 

  1. use a disciplinary perspective to analyze issues of social justice and equity;
  2. describe the challenges to achieving social justice; and
  3. identify ways in which individuals and/or groups can contribute to social justice within local communities, nations, or the world.



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