Jun 21, 2024  
2022-2023 Cal State East Bay Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Cal State East Bay Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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WOST 101 - Perspectives on Women


Units: 3 ; Breadth Area: GE-D1-2
An examination of gendered behaviors and expectations, as depicted in art, history, literature, philosophy, biology, anthropology, sociology, and psychology; attends to historical contexts and contemporary circumstances and examines impacts on women’s lives.

Possible Instructional Methods: Entirely On-ground, or Entirely Online, or Hybrid.
Grading: A-F or CR/NC (student choice).
Breadth Area(s) Satisfied: GE-D1-2 - Lower Division Social Sciences
Course Typically Offered: Variable Intermittently


Student Learning Outcomes - Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:
  1. To acquaint students with historical and global perspectives on women and specify how social, political, economic, and environmental systems and/or behavior are interwoven. 
  2. To explore individual and collective attitudes about gender and the ways in which sociocultural, political, economic, and/or environmental systems both produce, resist, and transform them.
  3. To make students aware of how social structures (such as class, race, gender age, urbanization, sexuality, ethnicity, and immigration, et. al) impact the lives of women.
  4. To trace the ways in which social problems impacting women are identified, perceived, and resolved.
  5. To teach students not to overgeneralize from personal experiences.
  6. To enable students to think critically about the social construction of gender and the ways in which it impacts principles, methodologies, value systems, and ethics employed in social scientific inquiry.


D1-2. Lower-division Social Science Electives Learning Outcomes
  1. Specify how social, political, economic, and environmental systems and/or behavior are interwoven;
  2. Explain how humans individually and collectively relate to relevant sociocultural, political, economic, and/or environmental systems-how they produce, resist, and transform them;
  3. Discuss and debate issues from the course’s disciplinary perspective in a variety of cultural, historical, contemporary, and/or potential future contexts; and
  4. Explore principles, methodologies, value systems, and ethics employed in social scientific inquiry.



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