Nov 30, 2022  
2021-2022 Cal State East Bay Catalog 
    
2021-2022 Cal State East Bay Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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ENGL 220 - Immigration and Migration in American Literature


Units: 4 ; Breadth Area: GE-C2; Diversity
Literary works that represent the social, political, and cultural effects of immigration and migration in the U.S.

Equivalent Quarter Course: ENGL 2600.
Possible Instructional Methods: Entirely On-ground, or Entirely Online, or Hybrid.
Grading: A-F or CR/NC (student choice).
Breadth Area(s) Satisfied: GE-C2 - Lower Division Humanities, Overlay - Diversity
Course Typically Offered: Fall ONLY


Student Learning Outcomes - Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:
  1. articulate their own ideas and interpretations about immigrant and migrant literature;
  2. listen carefully to and respect the ideas and interpretations of others;
  3. draw connections between the literature and the immigrant and migration experiences of themselves and/or others;
  4. write clear thesis-driven essays about immigrant and migrant literature, demonstrating analytical and persuasive skills;
  5. revise and improve their writing in both form and content;
  6. engage in collaborative assignments, such as discussion, oral presentation, and peer editing.


C2. Humanities Learning Outcomes
  1. Show appreciation for the humanities using their intellect, imagination, sensibility, and sensitivity;
  2. develop their affective and cognitive faculties through studying great works reflecting the rich diversity of human imagination and/or inquiry; and
  3. engage in critical self-reflection relating themes in the humanities to the students’ own lives.
Diversity Overlay Learning Outcomes
  1. describe the histories and/or experiences of one or more U. S. cultural groups and the resilience and agency of group members;
  2. identify structures of oppression and the diverse efforts and strategies used by groups to combat the effects of oppressive structures;
  3. analyze the intersection of the categories of race and gender as they affect cultural group members’ lived realities and/or as they are embodied in personal and collective identities;
  4. recognize the way that multiple differences (including, for example, gender, class, sexuality, religion, disability, immigration status, gender expression, color/phenotype, racial mixture, linguistic expression, and/or age) within cultural groups complicate individual and group identities.



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