Sep 15, 2019  
2019-2020 Cal State East Bay Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Cal State East Bay Catalog

Glossary of Academic and Advising Terms


Academic Advisor

Academic Dishonesty

Academic Probation

Academic Renewal

Academic Term

Academic Year

Advancement to Candidacy

AP (Advanced Placement) Credit

Articulation

Auditing Courses

Baccalaureate Degree

Blackboard

Capstone Experience

Career Services

Catalog Rights

Certificate Programs

Class Standing

Co-requisite

“Code” Requirement

Cohort

Comprehensive Examination

Concentration

Continuing Education

CoOp Ed

Course Description

Credit Equivalency

Credit Hour/Unit Value

Cross-listed Courses

Degree Audit Report (DAR)

Degree “Core”

Degree Plan

Doctoral Degree

Doctoral Student

Double (or Multiple) Majors

Drop vs. Withdrawal

Dual Enrollment

Dual Matriculation

Dual-listed Courses

Duplicate Credit

East Bay “Foundation”

Equivalent Course

FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid)

FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974)

Financial Aid

Free Electives

Full-time or Part-time Status

GE/GR (General Education and Graduation Requirements)

Grade Forgiveness

Grade Point Average (GPA)

Grading Patterns

Grading Symbols

Grad Student

Holds

Honors

Hybrid Course

IB (International Baccalaureate) Credit

Independent Study Course

Individual Study Course

Instructional Method

Issues and Special Topics Courses

Leave of Absence

Lower Division Courses

Major

Master’s Degree

Master’s Student

Matriculated Student

Matriculation

Minor

MyCSUEB

NetID

Non-catalog Courses

On-ground Course

Online Course

Open University

Overlays

Permission Number

Post-Baccalaureate Student

Pre-Professional Health Academic Programs (PHAP)

Prefixes

Prerequisites

Project

Repeatability

Self-Support

Special “Reg” Petition

Study Abroad Credit

Syllabus

Thesis

Title IX (Nondiscrimination)

Transcript

Turnitin

Upper Division Courses

UWSR

Academic Advisor: College staff member responsible for providing guidance in course and/or program-related topics including academic requirements; course schedules; personal, academic, or career information; and transition to college and academic progress. For additional information see the Student Services  chapter of the catalog.

Academic Dishonesty: Academic Dishonesty includes, but is not limited to: cheating, which includes possessing unauthorized sources of information during examinations, copying the work of others, permitting others to copy a student’s own work, submitting work done by others, completing assignments for others, altering work after grading and subsequently submitting it for re-grading, submitting the same work for two or more classes without the permission of all instructors involved, or retaining materials that students have been instructed to return to their instructor; plagiarism, which includes taking the words, ideas, or substance of another and either copying or paraphrasing the work without giving credit to the source through appropriate use of footnotes, quotation marks, or reference citations; providing materials to another with knowledge they will be improperly used; possessing another’s work without permission; selling, purchasing, or trading materials for class assignments (includes purchasing term papers via the internet); altering the work of another; knowingly furnishing false or incomplete academic information; altering documents that make up part of the student record; forging signatures or falsifying information on any official academic document; inventing data or falsifying an account of the method through which data was generated.  See also “Blackboard” and “Turnitin” in the glossary.

Academic Probation: A status assigned because a student’s academic performance is below the state minimum required for graduation, and that the student’s GPA must be improved before a degree can be granted. For additional information see the Grading & Academic Standards , Graduate Degree Requirements & Policies  chapters of the catalog.

Academic Renewal: An old Cal State East Bay term referring to the policy on Repetition of Courses and Grade Forgiveness. For additional information see the Grading & Academic Standards   chapter of the catalog.

Academic Term (semester): Fall, spring, and summer weeks when classes are in session.  The fall and spring semesters are approximately sixteen weeks long.  The summer session is between three to eight weeks long. Prior to the fall 2018, Cal State East Bay was on the quarter-term system.

Academic Year: The period beginning on the first day of the fall semester and ending the day before the first day of the next fall semester.  All Cal State East Bay catalogs are titled by its academic year, i.e. 2018-19; 2019-20; 2020-21, etc.  The Academic calendar for the current academic year is located on the catalog home page.

Advancement to Candidacy: Is a status which recognizes completion of substantial progress towards a student’s graduate degree. A student becomes eligible for Advancement to Candidacy when they: have become a “Classified” graduate student in good standing; have completed at least 9 semester units of 600-level coursework with a minimum 3.0 GPA; have designed a formal program of study approved by their graduate advisor; have fulfilled the University Writing Skills Requirement; have completed other department prerequisites for advancement; and are recommended for Advancement to Candidacy by their academic advisor (subject to approval by the department’s graduate coordinator). For additional information see the Graduate Admission, Enrollment, & Fees  chapter of the catalog.

AP (Advanced Placement) Credit: Credit awarded by Cal State East Bay for appropriate scores on Advanced Placement Exams.  For additional information see the Requirements, Exams & Testing  chapter of the catalog.

Articulation: Authority for decisions regarding the transfer of undergraduate credits is delegated to each California State University (CSU) campus. Most commonly, college level credits earned from an institution of higher education accredited by a regional accrediting agency are accepted for transfer to campuses of the CSU; however, authority for decisions regarding the transfer of undergraduate credits is delegated to each CSU campus. CSU campuses may enter into course-to-course or program-to-program articulation agreements with other CSU campuses and any or all of the California Community Colleges, and other regionally accredited institutions. Established CSU and California Community College articulations may be found on www.assist.org. Students may be permitted to transfer no more than 70 semester (105 quarter) units to a CSU campus from an institution that does not offer bachelor’s degrees or their equivalents, for example, community colleges. Given the university’s 30-semester (45-quarter) unit residency requirement, no more than a total of 90-semester (135-quarter) units may be transferred into the University from all sources.

Auditing Courses: An auditor (an enrolled student or non-enrolled individual) pays the same fees and enjoys the same instructional privileges as a student enrolled for credit but is not held responsible for examinations or term papers. Regular class attendance is expected, and enrollment as an auditor may be deleted if the expected attendance is not observed. If students wish to enroll in a course as an auditor, they must obtain permission from the instructor of the course. Enrollment as an auditor is permitted only after students otherwise eligible to enroll on a credit basis have had an opportunity to do so. Once enrolled in a course as an auditor, students may not change their enrollment to a credit basis unless such a change is requested no later than the last day to add classes. Students, who are enrolled in a course for credit, may not change to an audit basis after the Add/Drop period has ended.

Baccalaureate Degree: A baccalaureate degree, often called a bachelor’s degree, is the academic title that the university confers after successful completion of a minimum number of college credit units (120 semester units at Cal State East Bay), including certain specified patterns of coursework (for example, General Education and a major), a minimum number of advanced units (40 upper division) with a grade point average of at least 2.00 (on a 4.00 point scale), and various other requirements specified in Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations. Some students in higher unit majors will complete more than the minimum 120 semester units for their degree. Cal State East Bay offers three baccalaureate degrees, a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, a Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.), and a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. The degree awarded appears on the student’s diploma and permanent record. First-time freshmen can typically complete their coursework in four years if they earn 15 units per semester towards their degree.  Transfer students can typically complete their coursework in two years if they earn 15 units per semester toward their degree. Information concerning the graduation rates of students enrolling at Cal State East Bay is available online at: http://www.csueastbay.edu/ira/. For additional information see the Requirements, Exams & Testing  chapter of the catalog.

Blackboard:  A faculty and student log-in website platform that allows instructors to provide information on courses they are teaching to their students.  The information could include a course syllabus, documents, discussion boards, etc.  Some professors may use this site as a place to turn in assignments or complete exams. SafeAssign is a Backboard tool for instructors to prevent plagiarism.  An instructor may utilize this tool for certain classwork and require students to upload papers to SafeAssign. See also “Turnitin” in the glossary.

Capstone Experience: The capstone experience of a graduate program will be the successful completion of a thesis, project, or comprehensive examination. The quality of the student’s work, including quality of expression, is the major consideration in judging the success of this degree component. If a Master’s degree student changes from a program requiring a thesis to one requiring a project (or vice versa), they may count a combined maximum of 6 units for 691, 693, and 699 towards the degree.  See also “Thesis”, “Project”, “Comprehensive Examination” in the glossary.

Career Services (AACE): Office that provides services relating to major exploration, career planning and placement. For additional information see the Student Services  chapter of the catalog.

Catalog Rights for Graduation: As long as a student maintains continuous enrollment as defined in the Undergraduate and Graduate chapters of the catalog, the degree requirements will remain those of the catalog in effect at the time they declare their major, minor, or degree. However, students may elect to meet the requirements of the catalog in effect at the time of graduation. These principles are called “catalog rights.”  For additional information see the Graduation  and Graduate Degree Requirements & Policies  chapters of the catalog.

Certificate Programs: A certificate program is a coherent set of academic courses, considerably narrower in scope and objectives than a degree or major, for which students can receive a certificate upon its successful completion. Most certificate programs are oriented toward occupations and/or career skills. For additional information see the Requirements, Exams & Testing  and Graduate Degree Requirements & Policies  chapters of the catalog.

Class Standing: Undergraduate students are considered freshmen, sophomores, juniors, seniors, or graduating seniors based on the number of units earned toward the degree.  For additional information see the Registration & Enrollment  chapter of the catalog.

Co-requisite: A co-requisite course is a course that must be taken concurrently in the same semester or has been previously completed. Co-requisites, if required by the department, are stated in the course description. See also “Course Descriptions” in the glossary.

“Code” Requirement: Refers to the American Institutions “U.S. Code” requirement that all CSU graduates are expected to have knowledge of significant events in U.S. history; the role of major ethnic and social groups in these events; the political, economic, social, and geographic context of these events; the U.S. Constitution, U.S. political institutions and processes; the rights and obligations of U.S. citizens; the California Constitution; federal-state relations; and California state and local government, and political processes.  For additional information see the Requirements, Exams & Testing  chapter of the catalog.

Cohort: a group of students who work through a curriculum together to achieve the same academic degree together. Education and Nursing programs are commonly cohorted with structured curriculum.

Comprehensive Examination: A part of the capstone experience, a comprehensive examination is intended to assess the student’s mastery of relevant subject matter, their ability to analyze and integrate the knowledge of their field, their skill in critical and independent thinking, and their use of appropriate organization and accurate documentation. A record of the student’s examination (questions and responses) will be retained by their department. Some departments grant unit credit for exam preparation while others do not.  For additional information see the Graduate Degree Requirements & Policies  chapter of the catalog.

Concentration: Is a prescribed pathway through a major which allows for emphasis on a particular segment of the discipline (for example, the Accounting Concentration in the Business Administration Major and the Dance Concentration in the Theatre Arts Major). Not all majors have formal concentrations. Some majors with formal concentrations require students to select a concentration (e.g., Business Administration) whereas others do not (e.g., Chemistry). In some majors, different concentrations have different unit requirements. If a student declares a concentration when or prior to filing for graduation and meets the requirements, the concentration will appear on the student’s diploma. For those students who wish to complete more than one concentration and have the additional concentration(s) recorded, each must differ by at least three courses and nine units from any other completed concentration. Note: Students using past-year and archived Cal State East Bay catalogs for their catalog of record, will still see the term “option” being used in those catalogs. The definition for “option” and “concentration”, for catalog purposes, are the same.

Continuing Education: aka University Extension, Continuing Education (CE) at Cal State East Bay features a broad spectrum of degree and certificate programs, as well as individual courses that complement the University’s regular curriculum, and meet the academic, professional, creative, and lifelong learning goals of its diverse community.  Programs offered through CE are commonly referred to as “self-support”.  See also “Self-Support” in the glossary.

Cooperative Education: aka Co-Op Education, the Cooperative Education Course (CEC) is an academic course for which students can receive academic credit for working (paid or unpaid) in a job or internship. Fast Facts about Cooperative Education: Over 3 out of 4 of all U.S. undergraduate students will complete an internship or co-op prior to graduation; Over 80% of companies offer experiential learning opportunities as a way to identify talent and eventually recruit full-time employees; Employers report that they hire 50% of their intern and co-op students as full-time employees following graduation. Students should speak with their major department advisor about enrolling in such courses.  For additional information see the Orientation & Advising  chapter of the catalog.  See also “Career Services (AACE)” in the glossary.

Course Description: The description of and requisites required for the main topics covered in a course.  Descriptions for approved courses are located in the Course Descriptions  chapter of the catalog.

Credit Equivalency: A semester course that is replacing a quarter course(s) within a department, where both can be considered equivalent for major requirement, articulation, and academic renewal purposes.  If a course is equivalent, students who took the quarter version of the course, and passed, cannot then register for and receive credit for the semester version of the course. Equivalent Quarter Course(s), if appropriate, are stated in the course description of a course.  See also “Academic Renewal” in the glossary.

Credit Hour/Unit Value: The “credit hour” is defined as “the amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than: One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester or trimester hour of credit, or ten to twelve weeks for one quarter hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or at least an equivalent amount of work as stated above of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution, including laboratory work, internships, practice, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.” A credit hour is assumed to be a 50-minute period. In courses in which “seat time” does not apply, a credit hour may be measured by an equivalent amount of work, as demonstrated by student achievement. For additional information see the Registration & Enrollment  chapter of the catalog.

Cross-listed Courses: Cross-listed courses are two identical courses (number, title, units, classification and description are the same), but each have differing course prefixes. Cross-listed courses can belong to differing departments or the same department.  An example could be: ABC 123 is cross listed with XYZ 123 - they are the same course except for their prefixes. Cross-listed course-pairs are identified in their corresponding course descriptions. See also “Prefixes” in the glossary.

Degree Audit Report (DAR): The Academic Advisement Report (aka: DAR) provides valuable information about an undergraduate student’s progress towards graduation.  A DAR includes all courses taken by a student (including those transferred from other institutions) and compares those to the GE/GR requirements and major requirements.  DARs are located inside the MyCSUEB Student Center. See also “MyCSUEB” in the glossary.

Degree “Core”: Central coursework that pertains to all students pursuing a specific degree regardless of concentration.  See also “Concentration” in the glossary.

Degree Plan: An evaluation by the student and advisor of academic work completed and courses required for graduation.  A “Printable Degree Planner” (print-friendly checklist of degree requirements) is also available in the University Catalog as an icon located at the top of all academic program pages.

Doctoral Degree: Cal State East Bay offers one (Ed.D) doctoral program.  The Educational Leadership, Ed.D.  is a 60-unit program available from the Department of Educational Leadership .  See “Doctoral Student” in the glossary.

Doctoral Student:  A graduate student who wishes to pursue the doctoral program. Inquiring students should consult the Doctoral Handbook available from the Educational Leadership Department website for academic load information and specific degree requirements.

Double (or Multiple) Majors: Student majoring in two or more major programs simultaneously at the same University. Cal State East Bay students can pursue two or more majors simultaneously with permission, making sure they differ from each other by a minimum of 12 units.  The disadvantage of completing multiple majors while working on the same degree is that the student would have to delay graduation until they complete all requirements of all the majors. However, students are checked for completion of the General Education (G.E.) requirements only once. If a student completes a second baccalaureate simultaneously with their first baccalaureate, they will not need to take additional residency or G.E. units beyond those required for the degree they indicate as their primary baccalaureate. Students cannot get two degrees in the same field. For example, a B.A. with a major in Geology and a B.S. with a major in Geology, or a B.S. with a major in Business Administration (concentration in Accounting) and a B.S. with a major in Business Administration (concentration in Marketing) are not allowed. Note: Although students cannot receive two B.S. degrees in Business Administration, students can receive a single B.S. degree in Business Administration with two concentrations. Any concentration and minors completed within the student’s degree will also be recorded on their diploma and permanent record if requested.

Drop vs. Withdrawal: The word “drop” refers to official deletion of a course from a student’s record. If students cannot continue enrollment in a course for which they enrolled in for that particular semester, they must officially drop the course using MyCSUEB. Students cannot “drop” after the end of the Add/Drop period, but they can “withdraw” until the twelfth week of a full semester (shorter terms have different deadlines). The word “withdrawal” refers to official termination of enrollment in a class after the Add/Drop period. Students can withdraw from a class only for serious health or personal problems beyond their control. For additional information see Registration & Enrollment  chapter of the catalog.

Dual Enrollment: When a student earns both high school and college credit for a course.

Dual Matriculation: High school students who have the recommendation of their school principal and the appropriate campus department chair to enroll in certain special programs. For additional information see the Registration & Enrollment  chapter of the catalog.  See also “Matriculation” in the glossary.

Dual-listed Courses: Dual-listed courses are those that are identical in content with undergraduate and graduate students taught in the same classroom, with the same instructor, and at the same time.  However, the course requirements will be different for the undergraduate and graduate students.  The undergraduate course should have an upper division course number (i.e., 300-499); the graduate course will have a 600-level course number.

Duplicate Credit: A course that has previously been taken; a student cannot receive credit in the same course multiple times unless a course is designated “repeatable”.  See also “Repeatability” in the glossary.

East Bay “Foundation”: California State University, East Bay Foundation, Inc. is a non-profit auxiliary organization within the California State University system. For over 50 years, the California State University, East Bay Foundation (“CSUEB Foundation”) has been making a difference in the educational experience at California State University, East Bay and the overall campus environment. Its only goal is to support the University’s educational mission and to provide quality services that complement Cal State East Bay’s instructional programs. In the course of carrying out this mission, the Foundation enhances the University for thousands of faculty, staff, and students.  For additional information see Cal State East Bay at a Glance  and HOME - University Administration  chapters of the catalog.

Equivalent Course: A Cal State East Bay quarter course, which has been evaluated to be equivalent to its replacement semester course, where both can be considered equivalent for major requirement, articulation, and academic renewal purposes.  Quarter equivalent course(s) will be listed in the course description of the equivalent semester course. Students who took and passed an equivalent quarter course cannot then register for and receive credit for the equivalent semester version of the course.  See also “Articulation”, “Academic Renewal” in the glossary.

FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid): A standardized application including detailed financial data that is required to determine eligibility for most financial aid programs.  For additional information see Fees & Financial Services  and Military & Veterans Information & Services  chapters of the catalog.

FERPA (Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974): Protects a student’s academic record within the post-secondary educational setting.  For additional information see the Student Rights, Responsibilities & Conduct  chapter of the catalog.

Financial Aid: Funding provided to students from various sources to assist in expenses to attend college.  For additional information see Fees & Financial Services   chapter of the catalog.

Free Electives: Most students have some units not prescribed by general education, the major, or other graduation requirements. These range from no units in a few very large majors to a handful of courses in some relatively low unit majors. Free electives are courses students are free to select to complete their minimum unit requirements for the degree. Some students complete free electives with whatever looks interesting when they have free hours in their schedules, but most students have a purpose in mind. This could be taking more courses in the major to prepare for graduate school or employment, taking a minor or certificate program (defined in this section) to complement the major (e.g., an English major taking a Marketing minor), or simply following a special interest (e.g., dance or photography). No student is required to do any of these things, but it is important that students understand available choices.

Full-time or Part-time Status: Refers to classifications apply to students enrolled in the fall and spring semesters (not University Extension non­-degree programs and shorter sessions including summer).  Full­-time undergraduate students (including students seeking a second baccalaureate) are those enrolled in 12 or more units in a regular semester. Part­-time undergraduate students are those enrolled in fewer than 12 units. Note: in order to graduate in 4 years or 8 semesters, students must complete an average of 15 units per semester. Full­-time enrollment for veterans (or dependents of disabled or deceased veterans), or reservists under Chapter 30, 31, 33, 34, 35, or 106 is 12 or more units, according to V.A. regulations. For additional information see Military & Veterans Information & Services , Registration & Enrollment , and Graduate Degree Requirements & Policies  chapters of the catalog. See also “Continuing Education” in the glossary.

GE/GR (General Education and Graduation Requirements): The GE Program consists of coursework that all Cal State East Bay undergraduate students participate in, along with their major program, to develop and bolster a breadth of their knowledge and skills.  Cal State East Bay has a vibrant and meaningful GE Program that includes both state-mandated and CSUEB-specific (“local”) requirements.  In addition to the lower-division GE requirements for writing, the California State University system requires that all students must demonstrate competency in writing skills as a requirement for graduation and to receive a baccalaureate, master’s, or doctoral degree. This requirement was implemented system-wide in 1977. For additional information see General Education Program  chapter of the catalog.  See also “Overlays”, “Code Requirement”, “UWSR” in the glossary. 

Grade Forgiveness: Grade Forgiveness is the process that matriculated students seeking a bachelor’s degree follow, under limited circumstances, to remove the punitive effect of past academic failures. For additional information see the Grading & Academic Standards  chapter of the catalog. See also “Academic Renewal” in the glossary.

Grade Point Average (GPA): The student’s grade point average (GPA) is calculated by dividing the total number of quality hours (units attempted, excluding CR/NC courses) into the number of grade (quality) points earned. A 2.00 (C) average in all college/university courses, all Cal State East Bay courses, and all major courses are required for a baccalaureate degree (excluding “CR,” “NC,” “W,” and “AU” grades). All courses taken as part of the major, including those in other departments are included in the calculation of the major GPA. For additional information see the Grading & Academic Standards  chapter of the catalog.  See also “Grading Symbols” in the glossary.

Grading Patterns: Course descriptions identify the grading pattern for each course as either: A-F CR/NC (student choice), A/B/C/NC, A-F only, or CR/NC only.  Courses required for majors in a major department are offered in the A-F only pattern. Specific department exemptions are noted in the course description.  For additional information see the Grading & Academic Standards  and Graduate Degree Requirements & Policies  chapters of the catalog.

Grading Symbols: A list of Academic and Administrative Grading Symbols and their meanings can be found in the Grading & Academic Standards  and Graduate Degree Requirements & Policies  chapters of the catalog.

Graduate Student: A student is considered a Graduate Student at Cal State East Bay if they have been admitted as one of the following: A “post-baccalaureate student”, a “master’s student”, or a “doctoral student”. For more information see the Graduate Admission, Enrollment, & Fees  chapter of the catalog.  See the individual definitions in the glossary

Holds: A hold on a student’s account can be from various offices needing action from the student. Common holds are for delinquent accounts, immunization records, library books, unsatisfactory progress to degree, etc.  Students can see details on their holds through MyCSUEB. See also “MyCSUEB” in the glossary.

Honors (Academic Latin Honors vs. University Honors Program): aka ‘Graduation with Honors’ refers to candidates for the baccalaureate degree who may be eligible for the awarding of Latin Honors at the time of graduation: summa cum laude, highest honor (cumulative GPA, overall and at CSUEB, of 3.85-4.00); magna cum laude, high honor (cumulative GPA, overall and at CSUEB, of 3.75-3.84); or cum laude, honor (cumulative GPA, overall and at CSUEB, of 3.65-3.74). Graduation with honors is determined strictly on a GPA basis, and no additional coursework is required.  Note: Post-baccalaureate and graduate students are not eligible for Latin Honors. The University Honors Program (UHP) is different from graduation with honors. The UHP provides outstanding students the opportunity for academic challenge through the completion of specialized courses, seminars and projects under the direction of faculty mentors. For additional information see the Grading & Academic Standards  chapter of the catalog.

Hybrid Course: A hybrid class is taught with the aspects of both on-ground and online environments; access to a computer can be required. See also “Instructional Methods” in the glossary.

IB (International Baccalaureate) Credit: Credit awarded by Cal State East Bay for appropriate scores on International Baccalaureate exams. For additional information see the Requirements, Exams & Testing  chapter of the catalog.

Independent Study Course: An Independent Study course is a program of study, which is above and beyond the regular offerings of a department. The number of such a course is 490 and 690. Such a course is considered as elective credit in the program of a student working for a specified objective. Limitations apply, for additional information see the About Courses  chapter of the catalog.

Individual Study Course: An Individual Study course is a course that is listed in the Cal State East Bay Catalog but is not being offered during the term in which a student must gain course credit to complete a specified objective. Permission to take such a course may be granted only in cases of necessity, and arrangements must be made to determine how the faculty’s teaching overload (if any) will be made up. Students may obtain applications for Individual Study (Special Registration Petition) in departmental offices. They then return the application, with signatures of approval, to the departmental office during the enrollment period for that semester. For additional information see the About Courses  chapter of the catalog.

Instructional Methods: A course can be taught in any of three environments: Hybrid, On-ground, or Online. The instruction method(s) is outlined in individual course descriptions and noted in the course syllabus provided by the instructor.  See “Hybrid Course”, “On-ground Course”, “Online Course” in the glossary.

Issues and Special Topics Courses: Typically numbered 397, 497 or 697, a course which subject matter may vary from semester to semester; it may include readings, discussion, and research on contemporary and/or significant issues in a given subject matter.

Leave of Absence: aka Planned Educational Leave, is a documented leave of absence permitted to a student by the University under specific circumstances. Students may petition for a planned educational leave to pursue education related activities which will enhance the prospect of successful completion of their academic programs, but do not require enrollment at Cal State East Bay or any other institution of higher education. Students who are unable to enroll due to compulsory military service, or because of a documented disability, or because of pregnancy may apply for a leave of absence. For additional information see the Registration & Enrollment  chapter of the catalog.

Lower Division Courses (100 - 299): General introductory courses, usually making up the first two years of a baccalaureate degree. Credit awarded by a community college is generally considered lower-division credit. For additional information see the About Courses  chapter of the catalog. See also “Upper-Division Courses” in the glossary. 

Major: A major is a specified pattern of courses in a particular discipline or group of disciplines. The major allows students to specialize in one area and to study it in more depth than the one or two courses taken for General Education in other disciplines. Students also can design an Interdisciplinary Studies Major with faculty advice and administrative support (see the Interdisciplinary Studies, B.A. and/or Interdisciplinary Studies, B.S.  chapter of this catalog). A major is not the same as a career, though some majors are more closely aligned to specific careers than others. There are people in most careers from a wide variety of majors. Most programs of study list career options that are possible for that degree. A Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree major often requires more units in the major than a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree major. A Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) degree major requires more units than most B.S. or B.A. degree majors because it is so specialized. Students may declare their major either on their application when they apply to Cal State East Bay or after they enroll by filling out a “Change of Major” form available in the Student Enrollment and Information Center, 1st Floor, Student Services and Administration Building, online at the Student Records Forms website, or in the Student Services Center at the Concord Campus. Students must declare a major by the semester in which they earn junior status (60 units). High unit students may require permission from the Dean of Academic Programs and Services to change their majors. Students may complete more than one major at the same time with permission. All majors earned will appear on the same diploma. Note: At this time, Cal State East Bay does not admit post-graduate students for second majors. For additional information see the Academic Programs  chapter of the catalog.

Master’s Degree: The master’s degree is awarded for completion of a planned and integrated program of advanced study earned after completion of an undergraduate degree. It recognizes that a student has mastered a particular field sufficiently to pursue creative or applied projects in that field.  The minimum number of units for a Cal State East Bay master’s program is 30 semester units with a grade point average of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale), and various other requirements specified in Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations as well as requirements in this University Catalog.  It typically requires at least two years of full-time study (or longer if pursued part time) beyond the bachelor’s degree.  Master’s degrees are awarded in various disciplines as M.A. (master of arts), M.S. (master of science) or as discipline-specific degrees such as business (M.B.A), public administration (M.P.A.), or social work (M.S.W). A master’s degree provides students with a mastery of a particular area of knowledge; an ability to relate that knowledge to knowledge in other disciplines; an ability to deal systematically with the concepts, theory, and principles in new situations; an ability to formulate and deal with problems on an advanced level; methodological, technical, and communication skills essential for advanced study; an ability to undertake independent investigation and research; abilities characteristic of professional performance; and attitudes conducive to continuous intellectual and professional development. Every master’s degree program includes what is termed a capstone experience. This may include a thesis or its equivalent, a comprehensive examination, or project.  Completion of the capstone experience demonstrates that students have successfully integrated the various elements of the graduate learning experience and have gained an in-depth knowledge of their discipline. For additional information see the Academic Programs Graduate Degree Requirements & Policies  chapters of the catalog.

Master’s Student:  Is a student that has been admitted to a specific master’s degree program as a “Conditionally Classified” or “Classified” student, or to an advanced credential program which can be earned in conjunction with a master’s degree. Most master’s degrees are designed to be completed in two years if students are attending full time. A graduate student who wishes to receive a 30-unit master’s degree in two years needs to enroll in approximately 8 units for four semesters. (Eight units per semester is generally the minimum for full-time status.) The master’s degree is awarded for completion of a planned and integrated program of advanced study. It recognizes that a student has mastered a particular field sufficiently to pursue creative or applied projects in that field. Students who have completed a graduate degree will have acquired a mastery of a particular area of knowledge; an ability to relate that knowledge to knowledge in other disciplines; an ability to deal systematically with the concepts, theory, and principles in new situations; an ability to formulate and deal with problems on an advanced level; methodological, technical, and communication skills essential for advanced study; an ability to undertake independent investigation and research; abilities characteristic of professional performance; and attitudes conducive to continuous intellectual and professional development. Every master’s degree program includes what is termed a capstone experience. This will include a thesis or its equivalent, a comprehensive examination or an applied or specialized project that documents an internship, or a case study report, a musical recital, gallery showing, or other comparable achievement. Completion of the capstone experience demonstrates that students have successfully integrated the various elements of the graduate learning experience and have gained an in-depth knowledge of their discipline.  For additional information see the Graduate Admission, Enrollment, & Fees  chapter of the catalog.

Matriculated Student: A matriculated student is a regularly enrolled student after being admitted to the university.  For additional information see the Registration & Enrollment  chapter of the catalog.

Matriculation: Upon being fully admitted to the University and having submitted the Student Intent to Register form, the student is registered as a “matriculated student”.  For additional information see the Registration & Enrollment  chapter of the catalog.

Minor: A minor is a coherent program in some field or group of related fields other than a student’s major. Minors range in size from 15-30 semester units, at least 9 of which must be upper division. No student is required to have a minor, so it will not appear on the student’s record or diploma unless they request it. The minimum grade point average for a minor is 2.00, so students must take at least one course on the A-F grading pattern. At least 9 units must be taken at Cal State East Bay for a minor to be recognized on the student’s diploma and/or permanent record. Students who wish to complete a minor must submit a “Change of Major, Minor, Option” form available online at the Student Records Forms website. Students cannot receive a minor in the same department as their major unless the disciplines are distinct (e.g., French and Spanish, Art History and Studio Art). A minor is recognized only when a baccalaureate degree is awarded.  For additional information see the Academic Programs  chapter of the catalog.

MyCSUEB: A sign-in online tool used by students to view and keep track of their academic records; register for courses, including courses offered, hours, rooms, instructor names and final examination times; see final course grades; view and maintain financial/scholarship processes, etc.  See the MENU on the Cal State East Bay home page for access to the MyCSUEB portal.  Other important information such as the semester calendar, orientation, important dates, registration, fees, course selection, and student services contact information may be viewed at: www.csueastbay.edu/students/.

NetID: A login name provided by the University once a student is admitted to the University that contains no personal information about the user. It is used for logging into a variety of systems on campus such as students’ Horizon email, Blackboard, and MyCSUEBSee also “Blackboard”, “MyCSUEB” in the glossary.

Non-catalog Courses: Each semester, Cal State East Bay offers a variety of new courses whose descriptions are not yet in the catalog. Such courses carry full credit as regular courses in the curriculum. Generally, these courses will be numbered 497 or 697; new general education courses will be numbered 196 or 396. Students, therefore, should check with their advisors to confirm which degree requirements these new courses satisfy and not hesitate to take them. Descriptions of new, non-catalog courses appear in the Class Schedule each semester. A new course may be passed by examination or challenged only after it has been listed in the Class Schedule and has been or is being taught.

On-ground Course: An on-ground class is taught entirely face-to-face, exclusively within the classroom; technically a student in such a class would not be required to have computer access. See also “Instructional Methods” in the glossary.

Online Course: An online class is taught exclusively in an online environment; access to a computer would be required for all students.  No on-campus meetings are required. See also “Instructional Method” in the glossary.

Open University: Is a Continuing Education program that allows individuals to enroll in regular University classes without being formally admitted to the University. Regularly enrolled students are not eligible to take Open University courses.  A student enrolled in Open University may: examine a field of study before committing to a degree program; update job skills or obtain professional training; attend classes on a non-continuous basis; raise their grade point average prior to application; or enroll in classes if they’ve missed the Cal State East Bay application deadline. Go to Open University for more information, how to apply online and view application deadlines.

Overlays: Refers to a part of Cal State East Bay’s GE/GR requirements. For additional information see the General Education Program  chapter of the catalog.  See also “Code Requirement” and “GE/GR” in the glossary.

Permission Number: Permission numbers may be given out by academic departments offering a course during either the late enrollment period or for “instructor consent” courses.  These numbers will provide students with the department consent necessary to enroll in a specified course.  For department contact information see the Colleges, Departments, and Libraries  chapter of the catalog. 

Post-Baccalaureate Student: A student who has already formally graduated with a bachelor’s degree is considered post-baccalaureate; therefore, a “post-bacc” student is also considered a graduate student for purposes of admission.  If a post-bacc student wishes to achieve a graduate-level certificate, credential *, master’s or doctoral degree, s/he would apply to the University as a graduate student. *Note: There is a program offered at Cal State East Bay, called Bachelors Plus, that allows for an undergraduate to obtain a baccalaureate degree, as well as complete courses that prepares the student for a multiple subject credential.  For additional information concerning the Bachelors Plus Early Pathway program, contact both the Liberal Studies Program  coordinator and the Department of Teacher Education .  For additional information see the Graduate Admission, Enrollment, & Fees  chapter of the catalog.

Pre-Professional Health Academic Programs (PHAP): The PHAP certificate is designed to provide the competitive advantage needed to enter a health professional school and launch a rewarding career in medicine, optometry, dentistry, veterinary medicine, physical therapy, and other healthcare fields like public health, nursing and physician assistant.  PHAP is operated by Continuing Education, in collaboration with the College of Science , and prepares undergraduate and post-baccalaureate students interested pursuing one of these doctoral programs. For additional information see Academic Programs  chapter of the catalog.

Prefixes (Course, Dept, College): Prefixes are abbreviations for colleges, departments, and courses of study. Click on this PDF  link for course, department, and college prefix definitions.

Prerequisites: A prerequisite is another course or group of courses containing necessary background material for full understanding of the course content or a non-course requisite. Not all courses have prerequisites. If a course has a required prerequisite (as noted in the course description) it must be successfully completed before enrolling in the course. Note: While every effort has been made to include prerequisite courses within programs, prerequisite units may not be included in the total program units and therefore should be considered when planning a program roadmap.  Consult with an academic/faculty advisor or department for further information concerning prerequisites and program roadmaps.  See also “Co-requisites”, “Course Description” in the glossary.

Project (Capstone): A part of the capstone experience, a project is a significant undertaking in either a fine or applied art or a professional field. Projects should provide evidence of originality, independent thinking, and appropriate form and organization. Students are required to describe their project in a written abstract that addresses the project’s significance, objectives, methodology, and conclusions. In some cases, the student may be required to present an oral defense. Specific criteria for a Project (numbered 693) are the same as those for a Departmental Thesis with a few exceptions: An “RP” grade in a project course will become an “F” (no “NC” option) after one year if the project is not completed; and, while the project need not be considered a research resource, it should be of a caliber to constitute a valid terminal activity in a master’s degree program and will be permitted only when a thesis is not appropriate. For additional information see the Graduate Degree Requirements & Policies  chapter of the catalog. See also “Capstone Experience” in the glossary.

Repeatability: A course is not repeatable for credit unless it is designated as repeatable in the course description.  E.g. “May be repeated for a maximum of 4 units”.  See also “Course Description” in the glossary.

Self-Support: Refers to programs offered through Continuing Education. Separate registration, enrollment, and/or fees may be required for programs offered through self-support.  See also “Continuing Education” in the glossary.

Special “Reg” (Registration) Petition: Is documentation required from a student for special circumstances coursework outlined and provided by the department offering the course.  Typical courses that will require “Special Reg” petitions are: Independent Study, Individual Study, (Capstone) Project, (Departmental or University) Thesis. See these individual definitions in the glossary.

Study Abroad Credit: Credit earned by a Cal State East Bay student while studying, interning, researching, or doing service learning outside the United States.  Because of variation in educational systems and coursework, this credit should be reviewed by department faculty prior to the study abroad experience.  Credit transcribed from an institution outside the United States must be reviewed by specific department faculty to evaluate its applicability to the student’s degree program.  Aka Student Exchange programs, for additional information see the About the CSU , Student Services  chapters in the catalog.

Syllabus: Typically made available on Blackboard, syllabi are the primary means of presenting clear expectations for the shared responsibility of the successful completion of a course for both students and instructor.  A well-written syllabus is a roadmap to the essential features of a course, including assignments, assessments, and learning outcomes.  A Cal State East Bay syllabus will include: instructor contact information; course details including requirements, dates and deadlines, objectives and outcomes; required text(s), materials, and any student-supplied equipment that may be necessary; grading outline and attendance policy; policies on academic dishonesty, accommodations for students with disabilities, emergency information, and any other information that may be essential to the course and University’s missionFor additional information see the Orientation & Advising , Student Rights, Responsibilities & Conduct  chapters of the catalog.

Thesis (Department or University): A thesis is the written product of a systematic study of a significant issue. In the thesis, the student is expected to identify the issue, state the major assumptions, explain the significance of the project, detail sources for and methods of obtaining data, provide analysis of the data, and offer conclusions. The thesis should demonstrate original critical and independent thinking, appropriate organization and format, and thorough documentation. If the research involves human subjects, the protocols must be approved by the Institutional Review Board. For additional information see the “Standards of Research with Human Subjects”  and “Capstone Experience” sections in Graduate Degree Requirements & Policies  chapter of the catalog. See also “Capstone Experience in the glossary.

Title IX: Refers to Title IX of the federal nondiscrimination law: Education Amendments of 1972 that protects all people regardless of their gender, gender identity, gender expression or sexual orientation from gender discrimination, which includes sexual harassment and violence. See the Student Rights, Responsibilities & Conduct  chapter for definitions and codes on the following topics: sex discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, sexual assault, sexual battery, rape, acquaintance rape, affirmative consent, consensual relationships, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking. See additional information in Cal State East Bay’s sexual violence prevention and education statement, Title IX Notice of Nondiscrimination, which includes facts and myths about sexual violence and Victim’s Rights and Options Notice.

Transcript: An official transcript is the original record verifying a student’s enrollment and grades, and certified (by signature and/or seal) by the institution.  It is normally sent directly by mail upon the student’s formal request and payment of applicable fees.  For additional information see the Orientation & Advising , Student Services  chapters of the catalog.

Turnitin: Is one of several website tools for instructors to prevent plagiarism.  An instructor may utilize this website for certain classwork and require students to upload papers to TurnitinSee also “Blackboard” in the glossary.

Upper Division Courses (300 - 499): More focused coursework, usually making up most of the final two years of a baccalaureate degree. For additional information see the About Courses  chapter of the catalog. See also “Lower-Division Courses” in the glossary.

UWSR: Is the acronym for University Writing Skill Requirement and is part of the overall GE/GR requirements.  For additional information see the Requirements, Exams & Testing  chapter of the catalog.  See also “GE/GR”, “Code Requirements” in the glossary.